British Ancestry
SIR

Sir

Question: What does it cost when someone becomes a SIR, how much would it be to just get a crest made? Answer: It is not possible to obtain a knighthood, giving right to the title "Sir" by paying any money at all.

This honour is invariably given to subjects of Her Majesty the Queen only. It is an honour in recognition of outstanding services to the community. This may, of course, involve services that have cost the recipient of the title a good deal money. He may have been a philanthropist, being seen by some, effectively, to have purchased the title. In origin the title of Baronet (now rarely awarded) conveys the right, upon registration of proofs, to hereditary use of the title "Sir".

In early documentation priests were given the title Sir, somewhat equivalent to the monastic Dom.

Any other title of "Sir" is bogus and, if purchased directly for funding is fraudulent.

It is usually reckoned that anybody who gains a knighthood (with entitlement to be called "Sir") who has earned it by hard labour in his particular field in which he is pre-eminent. Alternatively he may have probably had to invest the equivalent of tens of millions of pounds/dollars in his philanthropic or cultural work, leading to his recognition.

In respect of a coat of arms, this honour can be obtained through Letters Patent issued under the seals of the Kings of Arms on the authority of Her Majesty the Queen. Chancery fees are payable which, with the cost of artwork and presentation of evidence and research, can amount to something in the region of 5,000/$7,000-$10,000. If you are interested in pursuing this, please contact me again and I shall happily give further advice. cecil@britishancestry.org

You may want to learn about the origins of heraldry.

How to obtain a Grant of new Arms.

What is the best of Heraldic Art?

What to read to learn more about a coat of arms?

How to join the Heraldry Society.

How can you find your ancestry.

Discover if anyone left you money.

What characteristics you have inherited.

How to interpret handwriting.

These and more questions will be answered soon.

Click to ARTICLES for more reading and advice.

The content of the texts on the Website remain the copyright of Cecil R. Humphery-Smith

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